Select languages to compare:

Labial
Coronal
Dorsal
Radical
Laryngeal
Bilabial
Labio-dental
Dental
Alveolar
Palato-alveolar
Retroflex
Palatal
Velar
Uvular
Pharyngeal
Epi-glottal
Glottal
Plosive
p           *t             k      
 
 
 
 
ʔ
 
Nasal
m         *n̊ *n n̠̥         ŋ̊ ŋ    
 
 
 
 
 
 
Trill
                           
 
 
   
 
 
   
 
 
Tap, Flap
                                               
Fricative
ɸ             *z     ʂ ʐ ç     ɣ                
Lateral fricative
 
 
 
 
                           
 
 
 
 
 
 
Approximant
                          j   w                
Lateral approximant
 
 
 
 
    *l̥ *l                    
 
 
 
 
 
 
Lateral flap
 
 
 
 
                   
 
 
   
 
 
 
 
 
 
Labial
Coronal
Dorsal
Bilabial
Labio-dental
Dental
Alveolar
Palato-alveolar
Retroflex
Palatal
Velar
Uvular
Sibilant affricates
            *ts *dz                    
 
Front
Near-front
Central
Near-back
Back
 
Close
Near-close
Close-mid
Mid
Open-mid
Near-open
Open
Selected languages: Highland chinantec
UPSID number: 6786
Alternate name(s): N/A
Classification: Northern American, Oto-Manguean
The languages has 41 segments
Frequency index: N/A
Sounds:
Comments: Quiotepec dialect. Highland Chinantec is spoken in Ixtlan district, Oaxaca, Mexico. Robbins (1968) analyzes it as having three level tones and stress. Syllables with short vowels have only one tone. Syllables with long vowels can have rising and falling combinations of these levels. The only syllable-final consonant is /?/. Oral and nasalized vowels occur after voiceless obstruents, but nasal consonants and prenasalized stops are in complementary distribution. This is interpreted as 'oralization' of nasals before oral vowels (i.e. /ma/=[mba] etc.) Clusters of /?/ + nasal or /w, j/ occur but all other clusters posited by Robbins have been interpreted as single segments. Note especially his 'hg' is interpreted as the voiceless velar nasal. Phonetically he transcribes it as a prenasalized stop with a voiceless nasal onset and although he says that 'h' can "precede any nasal" there are no examples of 'h' before 'eng' anywhere in his grammar.
Sources: Robbins, F.E. 1968. Quiotepec Chinantec Grammar. Papeles de la Chinantla, IV/8. Robbins, F.E. 1975. Nasal words without phonetic vowels in Quiotepec Chinantec. Bibliographie phonetique (Karger, Basel) no. 11: 126-130. Robbins, F.E. 1961. Quiotepec Chinantec syllable patterning. International Journal of American Linguistics 27: 237-50.