Select languages to compare:

Labial
Coronal
Dorsal
Radical
Laryngeal
Bilabial
Labio-dental
Dental
Alveolar
Palato-alveolar
Retroflex
Palatal
Velar
Uvular
Pharyngeal
Epi-glottal
Glottal
Plosive
p b                     k ɡ    
 
 
 
 
ʔ
 
Nasal
  m                         ŋ    
 
 
 
 
 
 
Trill
                           
 
 
   
 
 
   
 
 
Tap, Flap
              ɾ                                
Fricative
    f       s                               h  
Lateral fricative
 
 
 
 
                           
 
 
 
 
 
 
Approximant
                          j   w                
Lateral approximant
 
 
 
 
      l                    
 
 
 
 
 
 
Lateral flap
 
 
 
 
                   
 
 
   
 
 
 
 
 
 
Labial
Coronal
Dorsal
Bilabial
Labio-dental
Dental
Alveolar
Palato-alveolar
Retroflex
Palatal
Velar
Uvular
Affricates
                                 
 
Front
Near-front
Central
Near-back
Back
 
Close
Near-close
Close-mid
Mid
Open-mid
Near-open
Open
Selected languages: Tagalog
UPSID number: 2414
Alternate name(s): N/A
Classification: Austro-Tai, W. Malayo-Polynesian
The languages has 23 segments
Frequency index: N/A
Sounds:
Comments: Tagalog is spoken in Manila, most of Luzon and Mindoro in the Philipines. /o/ and /e/ were in predictable alternation with /i/ and /u/ in native vocabulary but loanwords from Spanish and English have added contrastive function to the mid vowels. OLAF HUSBY (L1-L2map EDITOR): The classification of /f/ as a phoneme is disputable. Schachter, who is quoted below, omits /f/ in his review of Tagalog in Comrie (1987) The World's Major Languages. There is also different approaches to descriptions of diphthongs. As /j/ and /w/ as classified at semivowels, they are not used to described diphthongs (defines as vowel + vowel). However, semivowel+vowel clusters as /ij/, /ej/, /aj/, /oj/, /uj/, /aw, /iw/ are attested.
Sources: Bloomfield, L. 1917. Tagalog Texts with Grammatical Analysis (University of Illinois Studies in Language and Literature 3/2-3). University of Illinois, Urbana. Schachter, P. and Otanes, F.T. 1972. Tagalog Reference Grammar. University of California Press, Berkeley and Los Angeles.
Use base consonants only

      CC, onset

      CC, onset (ordered by sonority)

      CC, coda

      CC, coda (ordered by sonority)

      CCC, onset

      CCC, onset (ordered by sonority)

      CCC, coda

      CCC, coda (ordered by sonority)

      CCCC, onset

      CCCC, onset (ordered by sonority)

      CCCC, coda

      CCCC, coda (ordered by sonority)

      CCCCC, onset

      CCCCC, onset (ordered by sonority)

      CCCCC, coda

      CCCCC, coda (ordered by sonority)