Select languages to compare:

Labial
Coronal
Dorsal
Radical
Laryngeal
Bilabial
Labio-dental
Dental
Alveolar
Palato-alveolar
Retroflex
Palatal
Velar
Uvular
Pharyngeal
Epi-glottal
Glottal
Plosive
  ⁿb         *t *ⁿd             k ⁿɡ    
 
 
 
 
ʔ
 
Nasal
  m           *n                    
 
 
 
 
 
 
Trill
                           
 
 
   
 
 
   
 
 
Tap, Flap
                                               
Fricative
  β                                         h  
Lateral fricative
 
 
 
 
                           
 
 
 
 
 
 
Approximant
                          j   w                
Lateral approximant
 
 
 
 
                           
 
 
 
 
 
 
Lateral flap
 
 
 
 
                   
 
 
   
 
 
 
 
 
 
Labial
Coronal
Dorsal
Bilabial
Labio-dental
Dental
Alveolar
Palato-alveolar
Retroflex
Palatal
Velar
Uvular
Sibilant fricatives
            *s                      
R-sounds
              *R                    
 
Front
Near-front
Central
Near-back
Back
 
Close
Near-close
Close-mid
Mid
Open-mid
Near-open
Open
Selected languages: Mor
UPSID number: 2429
Alternate name(s): N/A
Classification: Austro-Tai, Eastern Malayo-Polynesian
The languages has 19 segments
Frequency index: N/A
Sounds:
Comments: Mor is spoken on the Mor and Mamboor islands in the Southwest of Geelvink Bay, Inan Jaya, Indonesia. The prenasalized stops shown here only occur medially and at least some instances derive from a nasal + /v/, /r/ or /t/, and /?/, but other words seem to have basic prenasalized stops. Because clusters are otherwise absent, a case can be made for considering these as unit phonemes. Laycock reports there is a tonal system "which has not been fully analyzed". He notes high and low tones and leaves some syllables unmarked implying possibly a third (mid) level.
Sources: Laycock, D. 1978. A little Mor. Second International Conference on Austronesian Linguistics: Proceeding, Fasc.1 (Wurm, S.A. and Carrington, L. editors) Department of Linguistics and Research School of Pacific Studies, A.N.U., Canberra.: 285-291.